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The Calling Sheds

MacKinnon-Day, P The Calling Sheds. [Show/Exhibition]

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Abstract

Mackinnon-Day’s has been collaborating with female English farmers for seven years. This research interrogates why the wives of farmers were and remain some of the most elusive figures in agrarian history whose labour, on the farm, has been largely unpaid and unrecorded.

In The Calling Sheds (2019), Tracing the Landscape (2018) she has been excavating the minutiae of these woman’s lives, specifically, the physical evidence, historical background, psychological effect, social circumstances and political contexts.

Tracing the Landscape was a multi-layered digital and mixed media gallery installation. This comprised of an assembled immersive ‘sheds’ or environments that allowed for a communal space for the mapping of new arguments and interpretations that illuminated female agrarian history.

The Calling Sheds has extended this research to work with shepherds across the UK and Republic of Ireland: Teleri Fielden, Snowdonia, North Wales; Catherine O'Grady Powers, Louisburgh, Ireland; Lisa Berry, Cartmel Fell, Cumbria and Lisa Gast, Isle of Bute, Scotland. Through discussions and collaboration with this larger demographic she has erected individual sheds in the four farm locations. MacKinnon-Day will work collaboratively with each person to personalise the interior and exterior of the sheds.

Poets, musicians and performance artists from each country will also be commissioned to respond to the narratives in the shed of their country alongside Mackinnon-Day who will create a responsive work from her studio. A planned documentary feature-length documentary on the project is currently being discussed with a film maker.

The research examines how site intervention and collaborative artworks can offer women working with agriculture a voice, giving them access to national and international forums. This outcome has already enabled the exchange of ideas and working processes between women, embracing social inclusion and environmental sustainability in rural areas. The published work has been shared with a national and international social media network of farm workers and given extensive local and national media coverage.

Item Type: Show/Exhibition
Uncontrolled Keywords: women shepherds; rural; agriculture; sustainablity; collaboration; realtional aesthetics; gender politics
Subjects: N Fine Arts > N Visual arts (General) For photography, see TR
N Fine Arts > NX Arts in general
Divisions: Liverpool School of Art and Design
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2019 10:17
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 10:17
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090

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