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Cardiac output during exercise related to plasma atrial natriuretic peptide but not to central venous pressure in humans.

Yoshiga, C, Dawson, EA, Volianitis, S, Warberg, J and Secher, NH (2019) Cardiac output during exercise related to plasma atrial natriuretic peptide but not to central venous pressure in humans. Experimental Physiology. ISSN 1469-445X

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Abstract

NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? Is cardiac output during exercise dependent on central venous pressure? What is the main finding and its importance? The increase in cardiac output during both rowing and running is related to preload to the heart as indicated by plasma atrial natriuretic peptide but unrelated to central venous pressure. The results indicate that in upright humans central venous pressure reflects the gravitational influence on central venous blood rather than preload to the heart. ABSTRACT: Aim This study evaluated the increase in cardiac output (CO) during exercise in relation to central venous pressure (CVP) and plasma arterial natriuretic peptide (ANP) as expressions of preload to the heart. Methods Seven healthy subjects (four men; 26 ± 3 years; 181± 8 cm height; and 76 ± 11 kg, weight; mean ± SD) rested in sitting and standing positions (in randomized order) and then rowed and ran at submaximal workloads. The CVP was recorded, CO (Modelflow) calculated, and arterial plasma ANP determined by radioimmunoassay. Results While sitting CO was 6.2 ± 1.6 l/min, plasma ANP 70 ± 10 pg/ml, and CVP 1.8 ± 1.1 mmHg (mean ± SD) and decreased to 5.9 ± 1.0 l/min, 63 ± 10 pg/ml, and -3.8 ± 1.2 mmHg, respectively when standing (P < 0.05). Ergometer rowing elicited an increase in CO to 22.5 ± 5.5 l/min as plasma ANP increased to 156 ± 11 pg/ml and CVP to 3.8 ± 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.05). Similarly, CO increased to 23.5 ± 6.0 l/min during running with albeit smaller (P < 0.05) increase in plasma ANP, but with little change in CVP (-0.9 ± 0.4 mmHg). Conclusion The increase in CO in response to exercise is related to preload to the heart as indicated by plasma ANP, but unrelated to CVP. The results indicate that in upright humans CVP reflects the gravitational influence on central venous blood rather than preload to the heart. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Yoshiga, C. , Dawson, E. A., Volianitis, S. , Warberg, J. and Secher, N. H. (2019), Cardiac output during exercise related to plasma atrial natriuretic peptide but not to central venous pressure in humans. Exp Physiol, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/EP087522. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0606 Physiology, 1116 Medical Physiology, 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2019 12:24
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2019 11:43
DOI or Identification number: 10.1113/EP087522
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10094

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