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Reduced resting-state connectivity in areas involved in processing of face-related social cues in female adolescents with atypical anorexia nervosa.

Olivo, G, Swenne, I, Zhukovsky, C, Tuunainen, A-K, Salonen-Ros, H, Larsson, E-M, Gaudio, S, Brooks, SJ and Schiöth, HB (2018) Reduced resting-state connectivity in areas involved in processing of face-related social cues in female adolescents with atypical anorexia nervosa. Translational Psychiatry, 8 (1). ISSN 2158-3188

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Open Access URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0333-1 (Published version)

Abstract

Atypical anorexia nervosa (AN) has a high incidence in adolescents and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Neuroimaging could improve our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of eating disorders (EDs), however research on adolescents with EDs is limited. To date no neuroimaging studies have been conducted to investigate brain functional connectivity in atypical AN. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity using 3 T MRI in 22 drug-naïve adolescent patients with atypical AN, and 24 healthy controls. Psychological traits related to the ED and depressive symptoms have been assessed using the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale self-reported (MADRS-S) respectively. Reduced connectivity was found in patients in brain areas involved in face-processing and social cognition, such as the left putamen, the left occipital fusiform gyrus, and specific cerebellar lobules. The connectivity was, on the other hand, increased in patients compared with controls from the right inferior temporal gyrus to the superior parietal lobule and superior lateral occipital cortex. These areas are involved in multimodal stimuli integration, social rejection and anxiety. Patients scored higher on the EDE-Q and MADRS-S questionnaires, and the MADRS-S correlated with connectivity from the right inferior temporal gyrus to the superior parietal lobule in patients. Our findings point toward a role for an altered development of socio-emotional skills in the pathogenesis of atypical AN. Nonetheless, longitudinal studies will be needed to assess whether these connectivity alterations might be a neural marker of the pathology.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Springer Nature
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2019 11:25
Last Modified: 21 Mar 2019 05:38
DOI or Identification number: 10.1038/s41398-018-0333-1
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10372

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