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Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Screening and Treatment in Irish Prisons from a Nurse Managers’ Perspective - A Qualitative Exploration.

Crowley, D, van Hout, MC, Murphy, C, Kelly, E, Lambert, J and Cullen, W Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Screening and Treatment in Irish Prisons from a Nurse Managers’ Perspective - A Qualitative Exploration. BMC Nursing. ISSN 1472-6955 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Background: Prisoners carry a greater burden of physical, communicable and psychiatric disease compared to the general population. Prison health care structures are complex and provide challenges and opportunities to engage a marginalised and poorly served group with health care including Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) screening, assessment and treatment. Optimising HCV management in prisons is a public health priority. Nurses are the primary healthcare providers in most prisons globally. Understanding the barriers and facilitators to prisoner engaging in HCV care from the perspectives of nurses is the first step in implementing effective strategies to eliminate HCV from prison settings.
Aim: To identify the barriers and facilitators to HCV screening and treatment in Irish prisons from a nurse perspective and inform the implementation of a national prison-based HCV screening program.
Methods: A qualitative study using focus group methodology underpinned by grounded theory for analysis in a national group of nurse managers (n=12).
Results: The following themes emerged from the analysis; security and safety requirements impacting patient access, staffing and rostering issues, prison nurses’ skill set and concerns around phlebotomy, conflict between maintaining confidentiality and concerns for personal safety, peer workers, prisoners’ lack of knowledge, fear of treatment and stigma, inter-prison variations in prisoner health needs and health service delivery and priority, linkage to care, timing of screening and stability of prison life
Conclusion: Prison nurses are uniquely placed to identify barriers and facilitators to HCV screening and treatment in prisoners and inform changes to health care practice and policy that will optimise the public health opportunity that incarceration provides.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1110 Nursing
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: BioMed Central
Date Deposited: 29 Mar 2019 09:47
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2019 11:42
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10450

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