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H-ATLAS/GAMA: Quantifying the Morphological Evolution of the Galaxy Population Using Cosmic Calorimetry

Eales, S and Fullard, A and Allen, M and Smith, MWL and Baldry, IK and Bourne, N and Clark, CJR and Driver, S and Dunne, L and Dye, S and Graham, AW and Ibar, E and Hopkins, A and Ivison, R and Kelvin, LS and Maddox, S and Maraston, C and Robotham, ASG and Smith, D and Taylor, EN and Valiante, E and Werf, PVD and Baes, M and Brough, S and Clements, D and Cooray, A and Gomez, H and Loveday, J and Phillipps, S and Scott, D and Serjeant, S (2015) H-ATLAS/GAMA: Quantifying the Morphological Evolution of the Galaxy Population Using Cosmic Calorimetry. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 452. pp. 3489-3507. ISSN 0035-8711

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Abstract

Using results from the Herschel Astrophysical Terrahertz Large-Area Survey and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly project, we show that, for galaxy masses above approximately 1.0e8 solar masses, 51% of the stellar mass-density in the local Universe is in early-type galaxies (ETGs: Sersic n > 2.5) while 89% of the rate of production of stellar mass-density is occurring in late-type galaxies (LTGs: Sersic n < 2.5). From this zero-redshift benchmark, we have used a calorimetric technique to quantify the importance of the morphological transformation of galaxies over the history of the Universe. The extragalactic background radiation contains all the energy generated by nuclear fusion in stars since the Big Bang. By resolving this background radiation into individual galaxies using the deepest far-infrared survey with the Herschel Space Observatory and a deep near-infrared/optical survey with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and using measurements of the Sersic index of these galaxies derived from the HST images, we estimate that approximately 83% of the stellar mass-density formed over the history of the Universe occurred in LTGs. The difference between this and the fraction of the stellar mass-density that is in LTGs today implies there must have been a major transformation of LTGs into ETGs after the formation of most of the stars.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The version of record MNRAS (October 01, 2015) 452 (4): 3489-3507 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stv1300
Uncontrolled Keywords: astro-ph.GA; astro-ph.GA; astro-ph.CO
Subjects: Q Science > QB Astronomy
Divisions: Astrophysics Research Institute
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Date Deposited: 24 Jun 2015 09:29
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2015 14:20
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/1440

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