Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Metabolic rate limits the effect of sperm competition on mammalian spermatogenesis.

DelBarco-Trillo, J and Tourmente, M and Roldan, ER (2013) Metabolic rate limits the effect of sperm competition on mammalian spermatogenesis. PLoS One, 8 (9). ISSN 1932-6203

This is the latest version of this item.

[img] Text
36_delBarcoetal2013_PlosOne.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (682kB)

Abstract

Sperm competition leads to increased sperm production in many taxa. This response may result from increases in testes size, changes in testicular architecture or changes in the kinetics of spermatogenesis, but the impact of each one of these processes on sperm production has not been studied in an integrated manner. Furthermore, such response may be limited in species with low mass-specific metabolic rate (MSMR), i.e., large-bodied species, because they cannot process energy and resources efficiently enough both at the organismic and cellular levels. Here we compare 99 mammalian species and show that higher levels of sperm competition correlated with a) higher proportions of seminiferous tubules, b) shorter seminiferous epithelium cycle lengths (SECL) which reduce the time required to produce sperm, and c) higher efficiencies of Sertoli cells (involved in sperm maturation). These responses to sperm competition, in turn, result in higher daily sperm production, more sperm stored in the epididymides, and more sperm in the ejaculate. However, the two processes that require processing resources at faster rates (SECL and efficiency of Sertoli cells) only respond to sperm competition in species with high MSMR. Thus, increases in sperm production with intense sperm competition occur via a complex network of mechanisms, but some are constrained by MSMR.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: MD Multidisciplinary
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2015 14:54
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2015 14:54
DOI or Identification number: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076510
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/1780

Available Versions of this Item

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item