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Impact of ischemic preconditioning on functional sympatholysis during handgrip exercise in humans.

Horiuchi, M and Endo, J and Thijssen, DHJ (2015) Impact of ischemic preconditioning on functional sympatholysis during handgrip exercise in humans. Physiological Reports, 3 (2). ISSN 2051-817X

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Abstract

Repeated bouts of ischemia followed by reperfusion, known as ischemic preconditioning (IPC), is found to improve exercise performance. As redistribution of blood from the inactive areas to active skeletal muscles during exercise (i.e., functional sympatholysis) is important for exercise performance, we examined the hypothesis that IPC improves functional sympatholysis in healthy, young humans. In a randomized study, 15 healthy young men performed a 10-min resting period, dynamic handgrip exercise at 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 25% MVC. This protocol was preceded by IPC (IPC; 4 × 5-min 220-mmHg unilateral occlusion) or a sham intervention (CON; 4 × 5-min 20-mmHg unilateral occlusion). Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess changes in oxygenated hemoglobin and myoglobin in skeletal muscle (HbO2 + MbO2) in response to sympathetic activation (via cold pressor test (CPT)) at baseline and during handgrip exercise (at 10% and 25%). In resting conditions, HbO2 + MbO2 significantly decreased during CPT (-11.0 ± 1.0%), which was significantly larger during the IPC-trial (-13.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.006). During handgrip exercise at 10% MVC, changes in HbO2 + MbO2 in response to the CPT were blunted after IPC (-8.8 ± 1.5%) and CON (-8.3 ± 0.4%, P = 0.593). During handgrip exercise at 25% MVC, HbO2 + MbO2 in response to the CPT increased (2.0 ± 0.4%), whereas this response was significantly larger when preceded by IPC (4.2 ± 0.6%, P = 0.027). Collectively, these results indicate that IPC-induced different vascular changes at rest and during moderate exercise in response to sympathetic activation. This suggests that, in healthy volunteers, exposure to IPC may alter tissue oxygenation during sympathetic stimulation at rest and during exercise.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Blood flow; near‐infrared spectroscopy; sympathetic vasoconstriction; tissue oxygenation
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Wiley Open Access
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2016 15:50
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2016 10:09
DOI or Identification number: 10.14814/phy2.12304
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2161

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