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The Relationship Between Activity Pattern and Muscle Adaptation in Skeletal Muscle

Jarvis, JC (2015) The Relationship Between Activity Pattern and Muscle Adaptation in Skeletal Muscle. Artificial Organs, 39 (10). pp. 863-867. ISSN 0160-564X

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Abstract

Muscle is highly plastic in terms of size (maximum force), speed, maximum power, and endurance. Well-controlled studies in animals have shown that the adult skeletal muscle fiber has a remarkable ability to modify its gene expression so that with long-term substantial changes in the daily activity pattern the contractile phenotype can be modified across the whole spectrum of fiber type found in control muscle. The contractile phenotype in this context includes the isoform content of myosin and therefore the maximum velocity of shortening, the mitochondrial content and therefore the specific force and aerobic capacity (endurance), and the calcium handling proteins and therefore the speed of activation and relaxation. With voluntary exercise in human subjects, similar responses are observed, although the degree of transformation is restricted by the practical limitations of exercise dosing to changes in mitochondrial activity and muscle size rather than the more profound changes in contractile protein isoform that can be induced with artificial activation over a substantial proportion of the day.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Jarvis, J. C. (2015), The Relationship Between Activity Pattern and Muscle Adaptation in Skeletal Muscle. Artificial Organs, 39: 863–867, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aor.12622. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0903 Biomedical Engineering, 1103 Clinical Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Wiley
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2015 10:30
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2016 23:50
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/aor.12622
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2259

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