Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Cepaea nemoralis (Linnaeus, 1758) uses its shell as a defence mechanism to trap and kill parasitic nematodes

Williams, A and Rae, R (2016) Cepaea nemoralis (Linnaeus, 1758) uses its shell as a defence mechanism to trap and kill parasitic nematodes. Journal of Molluscan Studies, 1-2. ISSN 0260-1230

[img] Text
Mauscript_WilliamsandRae Copy[1].pdf - Accepted Version

Download (485kB)

Abstract

Slugs and snails are parasitised by a range of organisms including nematodes, bacteria, microsporidia, mites and flies (Barker, 2004). Of these, the nematodes are the most numerous and diverse as 108 species have evolved to parasitise molluscs (Grewal et al., 2003). One of these nematodes (Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita) is a lethal parasite of a range of pestiferous slugs and snails including Deroceras reticulatum, Arion ater and Helix aspersa (Wilson et al., 1993). P. hermaphrodita has been formulated into a biocontrol agent (Nemaslug®) by Becker Underwood-BASF available for farmers and gardeners (Rae et al., 2007). Nematodes are mixed with water and applied using spraying equipment to soil where then go and search for potential gastropod hosts. They are attracted to slug mucus and faeces (Rae et al., 2006, 2009) and upon discovery they penetrate through the slugs’ mantle and kill it between 4 and 21 days (Wilson et al., 1993; Tan & Grewal, 2001).

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Molluscan Studies following peer review. The version of record "Cepaea nemoralis (Linnaeus, 1758) uses its shell as a defence mechanism to trap and kill parasitic nematodes" is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mollus/eyv064
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0608 Zoology
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2016 09:19
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2017 00:50
DOI or Identification number: 10.1093/mollus/eyv064
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2905

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item