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Predictors of patient self-report of chronic kidney disease: baseline analysis of a randomised controlled trial

Gaffney, H and Blakeman, T and Blickem, C and Kennedy, A and Reeves, D and Dawson, S and Mossabir, R and Bower, P and Gardner, C and Lee, V and Rogers, A (2014) Predictors of patient self-report of chronic kidney disease: baseline analysis of a randomised controlled trial. BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 15 (196). pp. 1-9. ISSN 1471-2296

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Abstract

Background: Improving the quality of care for patients with vascular disease is a priority. Clinical guidance has emphasised the importance of early identification and active management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care in order to maintain vascular health. However, awareness of stage 3 CKD amongst patients remains limited. We aimed to identify predictors of patient self-report of CKD to inform tailoring of conversations around CKD in primary care for diverse patient populations.
Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 436 patients with stage 3 CKD from 24 GP practices taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating a complex self-management intervention, which aimed to support the maintenance of vascular health in patients with stage 3 CKD. Potential predictors of patient self-report of CKD included demographics, stage of CKD, cardiovascular risk, self-reported co-morbidities, health status, self-management ability, and health service utilisation.
Results: Around half (52%, n = 227) of patients did not self-report CKD. Self-report rates did not appreciably differ by practice. Multivariate analysis revealed that female patients (p = 0.004), and patients with stage 3b CKD (p < 0.001), and with higher anxiety levels (p < 0.001), were more likely to self-report CKD.
Conclusions: Self-report of kidney problems by patients on CKD registers was variable and patterned by sociodemographic factors. Although it cannot be assumed that failure to self-report indicates a lack of awareness of CKD, our data do suggest the need for greater consistency in discussions around kidney health, with meaningful and relevant clinical dialogue that is aligned with existing clinical encounters to enable shared decision making and minimise anxiety.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1117 Public Health And Health Services
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: BIOMED CENTRAL LTD
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2016 14:20
Last Modified: 18 Feb 2016 14:20
DOI or Identification number: 10.1186/s12875-014-0196-3
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2952

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