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The contribution of muscle hypertrophy to strength changes following resistance training

Erskine, RM and Fletcher, G and Folland, JP (2014) The contribution of muscle hypertrophy to strength changes following resistance training. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 114 (6). pp. 1239-1249. ISSN 1439-6319

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Abstract

Purpose
Whilst skeletal muscle hypertrophy is considered an important adaptation to resistance training (RT), it has not previously been found to explain the inter-individual changes in strength after RT. This study investigated the contribution of hypertrophy to individual gains in isometric, isoinertial and explosive strength after 12 weeks of elbow flexor RT.
Methods
Thirty-three previously untrained, healthy men (18–30 years) completed an initial 3-week period of elbow flexor RT (to facilitate neurological responses) followed by 6-week no training, and then 12-week elbow flexor RT. Unilateral elbow flexor muscle strength [isometric maximum voluntary force (iMVF), single repetition maximum (1-RM) and explosive force], muscle volume (V m), muscle fascicle pennation angle (θ p) and normalized agonist, antagonist and stabilizer sEMG were assessed pre and post 12-week RT.
Results
Percentage gains in V m correlated with percentage changes in iMVF (r = 0.527; P = 0.002) and 1-RM (r = 0.482; P = 0.005) but not in explosive force (r ≤ 0.243; P ≥ 0.175). Percentage changes in iMVF, 1-RM, and explosive force did not correlate with percentage changes in agonist, antagonist or stabilizer sEMG (all P > 0.05). Percentage gains in θ p inversely correlated with percentage changes in normalized explosive force at 150 ms after force onset (r = 0.362; P = 0.038).
Conclusions
We have shown for the first time that muscle hypertrophy explains a significant proportion of the inter-individual variability in isometric and isoinertial strength gains following 12-week elbow flexor RT in healthy young men.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-014-2855-4
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: SPRINGER
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2016 09:00
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2016 09:00
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s00421-014-2855-4
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2992

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