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Do PTK2 gene polymorphisms contribute to the interindividual variability in muscle strength and the response to resistance training? A preliminary report.

Erskine, RM and Williams, AG and Jones, DA and Stewart, CE and Degens, H (2012) Do PTK2 gene polymorphisms contribute to the interindividual variability in muscle strength and the response to resistance training? A preliminary report. Journal of Applied Physiology, 112 (8). pp. 1329-1334. ISSN 0021-8987

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Abstract

The protein tyrosine kinase-2 (PTK2) gene encodes focal adhesion kinase, a structural protein involved in lateral transmission of muscle fiber force. We investigated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the PTK2 gene were associated with various indexes of human skeletal muscle strength and the interindividual variability in the strength responses to resistance training. We determined unilateral knee extension single repetition maximum (1-RM), maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) knee joint torque, and quadriceps femoris muscle specific force (maximum force per unit physiological cross-sectional area) before and after 9 wk of knee extension resistance training in 51 untrained young men. All participants were genotyped for the PTK2 intronic rs7843014 A/C and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) rs7460 A/T SNPs. There were no genotype associations with baseline measures or posttraining changes in 1-RM or MVC. Although the training-induced increase in specific force was similar for all PTK2 genotypes, baseline specific force was higher in PTK2 rs7843014 AA and rs7460 TT homozygotes than in the respective rs7843014 C- (P = 0.016) and rs7460 A-allele (P = 0.009) carriers. These associations between muscle specific force and PTK2 SNPs suggest that interindividual differences exist in the way force is transmitted from the muscle fibers to the tendon. Therefore, our results demonstrate for the first time the impact of genetic variation on the intrinsic strength of human skeletal muscle.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 06 Biological Sciences, 11 Medical And Health Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: American Psychological Society
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2016 09:26
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2016 09:26
DOI or Identification number: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01137.2011
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2995

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