Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Do parental reports of routinised and compulsive-like behaviours decline with child's age?: a brief report of a follow up study.

Glenn, SM and Nananidou, A (2016) Do parental reports of routinised and compulsive-like behaviours decline with child's age?: a brief report of a follow up study. The Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 6 (1). pp. 104-109. ISSN 1927-0534

[img] Text
55411-199222-1-PB.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (165kB)

Abstract

Background: Routinized and compulsive-like behaviours are very common in young children; however, previous studies have shown inconsistent results as to the age such behaviours decline. Another issue concerns any association with later Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Method: Related measures longitudinal design: We compared parent ratings of children over a 6 year period. The sample consisted of 109 children (aged 8 to 18 years, 62 males). Measures were of routinized and compulsive-like behaviours, OCD behaviours, worries and fears. Results: Routinized behaviours decreased significantly over the 6 year period, but not for children reported to have difficulties. OCD behaviours increased significantly with 31% of the sample having above threshold scores; however, only one child in the sample had an OCD diagnosis. There were significant correlations between CRI, OCD and fear and worry scores. Conclusion: We confirmed the view that anxiety reduction is one of the functions of routinized behaviours. A small number of children had high scores on routinized behaviours and the OCD measure, but there was only 1 diagnosis of OCD in the sample. This suggests that they may be part of the typical distribution of such behaviours.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Canadian Center of Science and Education
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2016 11:55
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2016 11:55
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3116

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item