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A meta-analysis of the drive for muscularity's relationships with exercise behaviour, disordered eating, supplement consumption, and exercise dependence

Tod, D and Edwards, C (2015) A meta-analysis of the drive for muscularity's relationships with exercise behaviour, disordered eating, supplement consumption, and exercise dependence. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 8 (1). pp. 185-203. ISSN 1750-984X

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Abstract

We examined the drive for muscularity's (DFM) relationships with exercise behaviour, disordered eating, supplement consumption, and exercise dependence in males. By searching electronic databases, manually reviewing journal tables of contents and retrieved article reference lists, and corresponding with leading researchers, we identified 77 studies. A random effects model was applied to perform analyses and we adjusted results for possible publication bias. The average effect sizes (r) the DFM had with weight training (.31), non-weight training (.11), disordered eating (.30), supplement consumption (.36), and exercise dependence (.43) were significant (P < .05). The relationship between the attitudes and behavioural subscales of the DFM Scale (r = .47) was significant (P < .001). For supplement consumption, moderator analysis indicated that r varied significantly for questionnaire type and participant status (student versus non-student, P < .01). The small to moderate relationships indicate the value of adopting theoretical perspectives allowing the examination of the DFM's role in predicting exercise and dietary behaviour within a broader psychosocial context. Most researchers have studied these relationships in isolation. The relationship between the two DFM subscales implies that the questionnaire total score may better represent a commitment to muscularity rather than a drive per se.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology on 1 September 2015 available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1750984X.2015.1052089
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Date Deposited: 14 Apr 2016 09:14
Last Modified: 01 Sep 2016 23:50
DOI or Identification number: 10.1080/1750984X.2015.1052089
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3164

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