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Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

Stoeckel, T and Summers, JJ and Hinder, MR (2015) Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability. NEURAL PLASTICITY, 2015. pp. 1-5. ISSN 2090-5904

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Abstract

Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Science & Technology; Life Sciences & Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurosciences & Neurology; TERM POTENTIATION-LIKE; CORTICAL PLASTICITY; LIMB TRANSFER; OLDER-ADULTS; CORTEX; VARIABILITY; OCCLUSION
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: HINDAWI PUBLISHING CORPORATION
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2016 10:25
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2016 10:25
DOI or Identification number: 10.1155/2015/578620
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3461

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