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Left and right ventricular longitudinal strain-volume/area relationships in elite athletes.

Oxborough, D and Heemels, A and Somauroo, J and McClean, G and Mistry, P and Lord, R and Utomi, V and Jones, N and Thijssen, DHJ and Sharma, S and Osborne, R and Sculthorpe, N and George, KP (2016) Left and right ventricular longitudinal strain-volume/area relationships in elite athletes. International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging. ISSN 1573-0743

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Abstract

We propose a novel ultrasound approach with the primary aim of establishing the temporal relationship of structure and function in athletes of varying sporting demographics. 92 male athletes were studied [Group IA, (low static-low dynamic) (n = 20); Group IC, (low static-high dynamic) (n = 25); Group IIIA, (high static-low dynamic) (n = 21); Group IIIC, (high static-high dynamic) (n = 26)]. Conventional echocardiography of both the left ventricles (LV) and right ventricles (RV) was undertaken. An assessment of simultaneous longitudinal strain and LV volume/RV area was provided. Data was presented as derived strain for % end diastolic volume/area. Athletes in group IC and IIIC had larger LV end diastolic volumes compared to athletes in groups IA and IIIA (50 ± 6 and 54 ± 8 ml/(m(2))(1.5) versus 42 ± 7 and 43 ± 2 ml/(m(2))(1.5) respectively). Group IIIC also had significantly larger mean wall thickness (MWT) compared to all groups. Athletes from group IIIC required greater longitudinal strain for any given % volume which correlated to MWT (r = 0.4, p < 0.0001). Findings were similar in the RV with the exception that group IIIC athletes required lower strain for any given % area. There are physiological differences between athletes with the largest LV and RV in athletes from group IIIC. These athletes also have greater resting longitudinal contribution to volume change in the LV which, in part, is related to an increased wall thickness. A lower longitudinal contribution to area change in the RV is also apparent in these athletes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10554-016-0910-4
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Springer
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2016 08:12
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2016 08:12
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s10554-016-0910-4
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3911

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