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Victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicide

Debowska, A and Boduszek, D and Dhingra, K (2015) Victim, perpetrator, and offense characteristics in filicide and filicide-suicide. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 21. pp. 113-124. ISSN 1359-1789

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of most recent studies of parental and stepparental filicide. A detailed review of the literature revealed the importance of certain demographic, environmental, and psychosocial factors in the commission of child homicide. Our findings indicate that filicides perpetrated by genetic parents and stepparents differ considerably in terms of underlying motivational factors. Data in the literature suggest that biological parents are more likely to choose methods of killing which produce quick and painless death, whereas stepparents frequently kill their wards by beating. Research results demonstrate the victims of maternal filicides to be significantly younger than the victims of paternal filicides. Additionally, filicide-suicide is most often associated with parental psychopathology. Genetic fathers are at the greatest risk of death by suicide after the commission of familicide. These findings are discussed in relation to theoretical frameworks explaining the occurrence of child murder. Further, limitations of reviewed studies and directions for future research are presented. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1602 Criminology, 1701 Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier Masson
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2016 11:17
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2016 11:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.avb.2015.01.011
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4118

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