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Aerobic Fitness and Playing Experience Protect Against Spikes in Workload: The Role of the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio on Injury Risk in Elite Gaelic Football.

Malone, S, Roe, M, Doran, DA, Gabbett, TJ and Collins, KD (2016) Aerobic Fitness and Playing Experience Protect Against Spikes in Workload: The Role of the Acute:Chronic Workload Ratio on Injury Risk in Elite Gaelic Football. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. ISSN 1555-0273

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the association between combined session-RPE workload measures and injury risk in elite Gaelic footballers. METHODS: Thirty-seven elite Gaelic footballers (mean ± SD age of 24.2 ± 2.9 yr) from one elite squad were involved in a single season study. Weekly workload (session-RPE multiplied by duration) and all time-loss injuries (including subsequent week injuries) were recorded during the period. Rolling weekly sums and week-to-week changes in workload were measured, allowing for the calculation of the 'acute:chronic workload ratio' that was calculated by dividing acute workload (i.e. 1-week workload) by chronic workload (i.e. rolling average 4-weekly workload). Workload measures were then modelled against all injury data sustained using a logistic regression model. Odds ratios (OR) were reported against a reference group. RESULTS: High 1-weekly workloads (≥2770 AU, OR = 1.63 - 6.75) were associated with significantly higher risk of injury compared to a low training load reference group (<1250 AU). When exposed to spikes in workload (acute:chronic workload ratio >1.5), players with 1 year experience had a higher risk of injury (OR = 2.22) and players with 2-3 (OR = 0.20) and 4-6 years (OR = 0.24) of experience had a lower risk of injury. Players with poorer aerobic fitness (estimated from a 1 km time trial) had a higher injury risk compared to players with higher aerobic fitness (OR = 1.50-2.50). An acute:chronic workload ratio of (≥2.0) demonstrated the greatest risk of injury. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight an increased risk of injury for elite Gaelic football players with high (>2.0) acute:chronic workload ratios and high weekly workloads. A high aerobic capacity and playing experience appears to offer injury protection against rapid changes in workload and high acute:chronic workload ratios. Moderate workloads, coupled with moderate-high changes in the acute:chronic workload ratio appear to be protective for Gaelic football players.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2016 10:25
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2017 21:10
DOI or Identification number: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0090
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4137

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