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High-intensity efforts in elite soccer matches and associated movement patterns, technical skills and tactical actions. Information for position-specific training drills.

Ade, J and Fitzpatrick, J and Bradley, PS (2016) High-intensity efforts in elite soccer matches and associated movement patterns, technical skills and tactical actions. Information for position-specific training drills. Journal of Sports Sciences. ISSN 1466-447X

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High-Intensity Efforts in Elite Soccer Matches and Associated Movement Patterns, Technical Skills and Tactical Actions. Information for Position-Specific Training Drills..pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

This study aimed to translate movement patterns, technical skills and tactical actions associated with high-intensity efforts into metrics that could potentially be used to construct position-specific conditioning drills. A total of 20 individual English Premier League players' high-intensity running profiles were observed multiple times (n = 100) using a computerised tracking system. Data were analysed using a novel high-intensity movement programme across five positions (centre back [CB], full-back [FB], central midfielder [CM], wide midfielder [WM] and centre forward [CF]). High-intensity efforts in contact with the ball and the average speed of efforts were greater in WMs than CBs, CMs and CFs (effect sizes [ES]: 0.9-2.1, P < 0.05). WMs produced more repeated efforts than CBs and CMs (ES: 0.6-1.3, P < 0.05). In possession, WMs executed more tricks post effort than CBs and CMs (ES: 1.2-1.3, P < 0.01). FBs and WMs performed more crosses post effort than other positions (ES: 1.1-2.0, P < 0.01). Out of possession, CFs completed more efforts closing down the opposition (ES: 1.4-5.0, P < 0.01) but less tracking opposition runners than other positions (ES: 1.5-1.8, P < 0.01). CFs performed more arc runs before efforts compared to CBs, FBs and WMs (ES: 0.9-1.4, P < 0.05), however, CBs completed more 0-90° turns compared to FBs, CMs and WMs (ES: 0.9-1.1, P < 0.01). The data demonstrate unique high-intensity trends in and out of possession that could assist practitioners when devising position-specific drills.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 18/08/16, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02640414.2016.1217343
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science, 1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2016 09:15
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2016 11:02
DOI or Identification number: 10.1080/02640414.2016.1217343
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4143

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