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Synergies and trade-offs between renewable energy extraction and biodiversity conservation - a cross-national multi-factor analysis

Santangeli, A and Di Minin, E and Toivonen, T and Pogson, MA and Hastings, A and Smith, P (2016) Synergies and trade-offs between renewable energy extraction and biodiversity conservation - a cross-national multi-factor analysis. GCB Bioenergy, 8 (6). pp. 1191-1200. ISSN 1757-1707

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Abstract

Increased deployment of renewable energy can contribute towards mitigating climate change and improving air quality, wealth and development. However, renewable energy technologies are not free of environmental impacts; thus, it is important to identify opportunities and potential threats from the expansion of renewable energy deployment. Currently, there is no cross-national comprehensive analysis linking renewable energy potential simultaneously to socio-economic and political factors and biodiversity priority locations. Here, we quantify the relationship between the fraction of land-based renewable energy (including solar photovoltaic, wind and bioenergy) potential available outside the top biodiversity areas (i.e. outside the highest ranked 30% priority areas for biodiversity conservation) within each country, with selected socio-economic and geopolitical factors as well as biodiversity assets. We do so for two scenarios that identify priority areas for biodiversity conservation alternatively in a globally coordinated manner vs. separately for individual countries. We show that very different opportunities and challenges emerge if the priority areas for biodiversity protection are identified globally or designated nationally. In the former scenario, potential for solar, wind and bioenergy outside the top biodiversity areas is highest in developing countries, in sparsely populated countries and in countries of low biodiversity potential but with high air pollution mortality. Conversely, when priority areas for biodiversity protection are designated nationally, renewable energy potential outside the top biodiversity areas is highest in countries with good governance but also in countries with high biodiversity potential and population density. Overall, these results identify both clear opportunities but also risks that should be considered carefully when making decisions about renewable energy policies.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Applied Mathematics
Publisher: Wiley Open Access
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2016 09:59
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2017 05:36
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/gcbb.12337
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4640

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