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Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene influences skeletal muscle phenotypes in non-resistance trained males and elite rugby playing position.

Heffernan, SM and Stebbings, GK and Kilduff, LP and Erskine, RM and Day, SH and Morse, CI and McPhee, JS and Cook, CJ and Vance, B and Ribbans, WJ and Raleigh, SM and Roberts, C and Bennett, MA and Wang, G and Collins, M and Pitsiladis, YP and Williams, AG (2017) Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene influences skeletal muscle phenotypes in non-resistance trained males and elite rugby playing position. BMC Genetics, 18 (4). ISSN 1471-2156

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: FTO gene variants have been associated with obesity phenotypes in sedentary and obese populations, but rarely with skeletal muscle and elite athlete phenotypes. METHODS: In 1089 participants, comprising 530 elite rugby athletes and 559 non-athletes, DNA was collected and genotyped for the FTO rs9939609 variant using real-time PCR. In a subgroup of non-resistance trained individuals (NT; n = 120), we also assessed structural and functional skeletal muscle phenotypes using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, ultrasound and isokinetic dynamometry. In a subgroup of rugby athletes (n = 77), we assessed muscle power during a countermovement jump. RESULTS: In NT, TT genotype and T allele carriers had greater total body (4.8% and 4.1%) and total appendicular lean mass (LM; 3.0% and 2.1%) compared to AA genotype, with greater arm LM (0.8%) in T allele carriers and leg LM (2.1%) for TT, compared to AA genotype. Furthermore, the T allele was more common (94%) in selected elite rugby union athletes (back three and centre players) who are most reliant on LM rather than total body mass for success, compared to other rugby athletes (82%; P = 0.01, OR = 3.34) and controls (84%; P = 0.03, OR = 2.88). Accordingly, these athletes had greater peak power relative to body mass than other rugby athletes (14%; P = 2 x 10(-6)). CONCLUSION: Collectively, these results suggest that the T allele is associated with increased LM and elite athletic success. This has implications for athletic populations, as well as conditions characterised by low LM such as sarcopenia and cachexia.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0604 Genetics
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: BioMed Central LTD
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 25 Jan 2017 11:19
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2017 10:39
DOI or Identification number: 10.1186/s12863-017-0470-1
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5360

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