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The Effect of "Pumping" and "Nonpumping" Techniques on Velocity Production and Muscle Activity During Field-Based BMX Cycling.

Rylands, LP and Hurst, HT and Roberts, SJ and Graydon, RW (2017) The Effect of "Pumping" and "Nonpumping" Techniques on Velocity Production and Muscle Activity During Field-Based BMX Cycling. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31 (2). pp. 445-450. ISSN 1533-4287

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Abstract

Rylands, LP, Hurst, HT, Roberts, SJ, and Graydon, RW. The effect of "pumping" and "nonpumping" techniques on velocity production and muscle activity during field-based BMX cycling. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 445-450, 2017-The aim of the current study was to determine if a technique called "pumping" had a significant effect on velocity production in Bicycle Motocross (BMX) cycling. Ten National standard male BMX riders fitted with surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors completed a timed lap of an indoor BMX track using the technique of pumping, and a lap without pumping. The lap times were recorded for both trials and their surface sEMG was recorded to ascertain any variation in muscle activation of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, vastus lateralis, and medial gastrocnemius. The findings revealed no significant differences between any of muscle groups (p > 0.05). However, significant differences (p < 0.001) were observed between the pumping and nonpumping trials for both mean lap velocity (42 ± 1.8 km·h, 33 ± 2.9 km·h, respectively) and lap times (43.3 ± 3.1 seconds, 34.7 ± 1.49 seconds, respectively). The lap times recorded for the pumping trials were 19.50 ± 4.25% lower than the nonpumping, whereas velocity production was 21.81 ± 5.31% greater in the pumping trial compared with the nonpumping trial. The technique of pumping contributed significantly to velocity production, although not at the cost of additional muscle activity. From a physiological and technical perspective, coaches and riders should prioritize this technique when devising training regimes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Author contacted for acceptance date. MS 7/2/17
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: School of Sport Studies, Leisure and Nutrition
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 07 Feb 2017 12:12
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2017 14:44
DOI or Identification number: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001499
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5456

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