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Further education improves cognitive reserve and triggers improvement in selective cognitive functions in older adults: The Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project

Thow, ME and Summers, MJ and Saunders, NL and Summers, JJ and Ritchie, K and Vickers, JC (2017) Further education improves cognitive reserve and triggers improvement in selective cognitive functions in older adults: The Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project. Alzheimer's & Dementia : diagnosis, assessment & disease monitoring, 10. pp. 22-30. ISSN 2352-8729

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Abstract

Introduction The strong link between early-life education and subsequent reduced risk of dementia suggests that education in later life could enhance cognitive function and may reduce age-related cognitive decline and protect against dementia. Methods Episodic memory, working memory, executive function, and language processing performances were assessed annually over 4 years in 359 healthy older adults who attended university for a minimum of 12 months (intervention) and were compared against 100 healthy adult controls. Results Multiple group latent growth curve modeling revealed a significant improvement in language processing capacity over time in the intervention group. No changes were detected for episodic memory, working memory, or executive function. Discussion These results suggest that complex mental stimulation resulting from late-life further education results in improved crystallized knowledge but no changes to fluid cognitive functions. © 2017 The Authors

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2017 11:59
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2017 11:59
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.dadm.2017.08.004
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7435

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