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Stress distribution of metatarsals during forefoot strike versus rearfoot strike: A finite element study.

Li, S and Zhang, Y and Gu, Y and Ren, J (2017) Stress distribution of metatarsals during forefoot strike versus rearfoot strike: A finite element study. Computers in Biology and Medicine, 91. pp. 38-46. ISSN 0010-4825

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Abstract

Due to the limitations of experimental approaches, comparison of the internal deformation and stresses of the human man foot between forefoot and rearfoot landing is not fully established. The objective of this work is to develop an effective FE modelling approach to comparatively study the stresses and energy in the foot during forefoot strike (FS) and rearfoot strike (RS). The stress level and rate of stress increase in the Metatarsals are established and the injury risk between these two landing styles is evaluated and discussed. A detailed subject specific FE foot model is developed and validated. A hexahedral dominated meshing scheme was applied on the surface of the foot bones and skin. An explicit solver (Abaqus/Explicit) was used to stimulate the transient landing process. The deformation and internal energy of the foot and stresses in the metatarsals are comparatively investigated. The results for forefoot strike tests showed an overall higher average stress level in the metatarsals during the entire landing cycle than that for rearfoot strike. The increase rate of the metatarsal stress from the 0.5 body weight (BW) to 2 BW load point is 30.76% for forefoot strike and 21.39% for rearfoot strike. The maximum rate of stress increase among the five metatarsals is observed on the 1st metatarsal in both landing modes. The results indicate that high stress level during forefoot landing phase may increase potential of metatarsal injuries.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 08 Information And Computing Sciences, 11 Medical And Health Sciences, 17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
T Technology > TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
Divisions: Maritime and Mechanical Engineering
Publisher: Elsevier
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 05 Dec 2017 11:40
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2017 11:40
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.compbiomed.2017.09.018
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7667

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