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The acute effect of black tea consumption on resistance artery endothelial function in healthy subjects. A randomized controlled trial

Greyling, A, Wolters, TLC, de Bresser, DM, Roerink, SHPP, Riksen, NP, Mulder, TP, Rowson, MJ, Hopman, MT and Thijssen, DHJ (2017) The acute effect of black tea consumption on resistance artery endothelial function in healthy subjects. A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Nutrition ESPEN. ISSN 2405-4577

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Abstract

Background & aims: Black tea is a main source of flavonoids in the Western diet and has been associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, possibly through lowering blood pressure. These effects may be mediated through improving endothelial function of resistance arteries. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the acute impact of black tea on forearm resistance artery endothelial function in healthy, normotensive middle-aged subjects. Methods: Twenty middle-aged men and women (age-range 45-75 years) were recruited into a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover intervention study. Forearm resistance artery blood flow (FBF, measured using venous occlusion plethysmography) in response to incremental doses of acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside and L-N G -monomethyl arginine were determined 2 h after consumption of either black tea containing ~400 mg flavonoids (equivalent to 2-3 cups of tea) or a taste- and color-matched placebo. Results: The mean FBF-response to acetylcholine after tea consumption was 23% higher compared to the response after placebo (95% CI: -20%, +88%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.32). No significant differences in the FBF-responses to sodium nitroprusside and L-N G -monomethyl arginine were found between the tea and placebo interventions (P = 0.96 and 0.74, respectively). Correcting FBF for changes in blood pressure did not alter the outcomes. Conclusions: We found no evidence that acute intake of black tea significantly altered endothelium-dependent vasodilation of forearm resistance arteries in healthy middle-aged subjects. Interventions with a longer duration of tea ingestion are required to further explore the (long-term) impact of tea flavonoids on blood pressure regulatory mechanisms. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02328339. © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2017 13:45
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2017 13:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2017.10.011
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7691

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