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High dietary fat intake increases fat oxidation and reduces skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in trained humans.

Leckey, JJ, Hoffman, NJ, Parr, EB, Devlin, BL, Trewin, AJ, Stepto, NK, Morton, JP, Burke, LM and Hawley, JA (2018) High dietary fat intake increases fat oxidation and reduces skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in trained humans. The FASEB Journal. ISSN 0892-6638 (Accepted)

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Abstract

High-fat, low-carbohydrate (CHO) diets increase whole-body rates of fat oxidation and down-regulate CHO metabolism. We measured substrate utilization and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration to determine whether these adaptations are driven by high fat or low CHO availability. In a randomized crossover design, 8 male cyclists consumed 5 d of a high-CHO diet [>70% energy intake (EI)], followed by 5 d of either an isoenergetic high-fat (HFAT; >65% EI) or high-protein diet (HPRO; >65% EI) with CHO intake clamped at <20% EI. During the intervention, participants undertook daily exercise training. On d 6, participants consumed a high-CHO diet before performing 100 min of submaximal steady-state cycling plus an ∼30-min time trial. After 5 d of HFAT, skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration supported by octanoylcarnitine and pyruvate, as well as uncoupled respiration, was decreased at rest, and rates of whole-body fat oxidation were higher during exercise compared with HPRO. After 1 d of high-CHO diet intake, mitochondrial respiration returned to baseline values in HFAT, whereas rates of substrate oxidation returned toward baseline in both conditions. These findings demonstrate that high dietary fat intake, rather than low-CHO intake, contributes to reductions in mitochondrial respiration and increases in whole-body rates of fat oxidation after a consuming a high-fat, low-CHO diet.-Leckey, J. J., Hoffman, N. J., Parr, E. B., Devlin, B. L., Trewin, A. J., Stepto, N. K., Morton, J. P., Burke, L. M., Hawley, J. A. High dietary fat intake increases fat oxidation and reduces skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in trained humans.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology, 0606 Physiology, 1116 Medical Physiology
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Federation of American Society of Experimental Biology
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2018 09:44
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2018 18:02
DOI or Identification number: 10.1096/fj.201700993R
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7985

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