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Identifying a typology of men who use Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS)

Zahnow, R, McVeigh, J, Bates, G, Hope, V, Kean, J, Campbell, J and Smith, J Identifying a typology of men who use Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS). International Journal of Drug Policy. ISSN 0955-3959 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Abstract: Background: Despite recognition that the Anabolic Androgenic Steroid (AAS) using population is diverse, empirical studies to develop theories to conceptualise this variance in use have been limited. Methods: In this study, using cluster analysis and multinomial logistic regression, we identify typologies of people who use AAS and examine variations in motivations for AAS use across types in a sample of 611 men who use AAS. Results: The cluster analysis identified four groups in the data with different risk profiles. These groups largely reflect the ideal types of people who use AAS proposed by Christiansen and colleagues (2016): Cluster 1 (You Only Live Once (YOLO) type, n=68, 11.1%) were younger and motivated by fat loss; Cluster 2 (Well-being type, n=236, 38.6%) were concerned with getting fit; Cluster 3 (Athlete type, n=155, 25.4%) were motivated by muscle and strength gains; Cluster 4 (Expert type, n=152, 24.9%) were focused on specific goals (i.e. not 'getting fit'). Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the need to make information about AAS accessible to the general population and to inform health service providers about variations in motivations and associated risk behaviours. Attention should also be given to ensuring existing harm minimisation services are equipped to disseminate information about safe intra-muscular injecting and ensuring needle disposal sites are accessible to the different types.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 11 Medical And Health Sciences, 17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences, 16 Studies In Human Society
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2018 15:59
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2018 19:39
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8081

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