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Social touch and human development.

Cascio, CJ, Moore, DJ and McGlone, FP (2018) Social touch and human development. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. ISSN 1878-9293

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Abstract

Social touch is a powerful force in human development, shaping social reward, attachment, cognitive, communication, and emotional regulation from infancy and throughout life. In this review, we consider the question of how social touch is defined from both bottom-up and top-down perspectives. In the former category, there is a clear role for the C-touch (CT) system, which constitutes a unique submodality that mediates affective touch and contrasts with discriminative touch. Top-down factors such as culture, personal relationships, setting, gender, and other contextual influences are also important in defining and interpreting social touch. The critical role of social touch throughout the lifespan is considered, with special attention to infancy and young childhood, a time during which social touch and its neural, behavioral, and physiological contingencies contribute to reinforcement-based learning and impact a variety of developmental trajectories. Finally, the role of social touch in an example of disordered development -autism spectrum disorder-is reviewed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Affective; Autism; CT afferents; Development; Discriminative; Social; Tactile; Touch
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 11 May 2018 11:40
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2018 07:09
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.dcn.2018.04.009
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8650

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