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Cyberbullying victimisation and mental distress: testing the moderating role of attachment security, social support, and coping styles

Worsley, JD, McIntyre, JC and Corcoran, R (2018) Cyberbullying victimisation and mental distress: testing the moderating role of attachment security, social support, and coping styles. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties. ISSN 1363-2752

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Abstract

Although it has been well established that cyberbullying leads to mental health problems, less is known about the factors that confer resilience to the adverse effects of cyberbullying among young people. To address this gap, adolescents aged 13–19 years (n = 476) completed a survey measuring cyberbullying victimisation, attachment styles, perceived social support, coping styles, and mental distress. Compared to non-victims, victims of cyberbullying experienced higher levels of depression and anxiety and endorsed more self-statements indicative of attachment anxiety. Peer support, security in attachment relationships, and the endorsement of positive coping strategies attenuated the positive relationship between cyberbullying victimisation and mental health difficulties. Family support did not appear to buffer adolescents from mental distress in this context. However, family support was the strongest bivariate predictor of reduced mental distress. Although peer relations should be the target of intervention programmes within school settings, the findings highlight the importance of including families in cyberbullying prevention programmes. © 2018, © 2018 SEBDA.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties on 12/10/18, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13632752.2018.1530497
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1303 Specialist Studies In Education
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2018 10:07
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2018 13:42
DOI or Identification number: 10.1080/13632752.2018.1530497
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9600

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