Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Autistic-like traits in children are associated with enhanced performance in a qualitative visual working memory task.

Hamilton, CJ, Mammarella, IC and Giofré, D (2018) Autistic-like traits in children are associated with enhanced performance in a qualitative visual working memory task. Autism Research, 11 (11). pp. 1494-1499. ISSN 1939-3792

[img] Text
Autistic-like traits in children are associated with enhanced performance in a qualitative visual working memory task..pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 22 October 2019.

Download (774kB)

Abstract

Prior research has suggested that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) demonstrate heterogeneity in cognitive efficacy, challenged executive resources but efficient visual processing. These contrasts lead to opposing predictions about visuospatial working memory competency in both ASD and the broader autism phenotype (BAP); compromised by constrained executive processes, but potentially scaffolded by effective visual representation. It is surprising therefore, that there is a paucity of visual working memory (VWM) research in both the ASD and BAP populations, which have focused upon the visual features of the to-be-remembered stimulus. We assessed whether individual differences in VWM were associated with autistic-like traits (ALTs) in the BAP. About 76 children carried out the Visual Just Noticeable Difference task, designed to measure high fidelity feature representation within VWM. ALTs were measured with the Children's Empathy Quotient and Systemizing Quotient. Analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between Systemizing and VWM performance. This complements ASD studies in visual processing and highlights the need for further research on the working memory-long-term memory interface in ASD and BAP populations. Autism Research 2018, 11: 1494-1499. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: This study was interested in how well children with high levels of autistic-like traits (ALTs) carry out a task which involved memorizing, for brief time, the precise size of colored shapes. The results suggested that children with high levels of ALTs performed the task relatively well. This finding is in contrast to many previous studies suggest that ALTs are associated with poor memory, and suggests that future research needs to look more finely at how individuals carry out these tasks.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1109 Neurosciences, 1701 Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2018 10:27
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2018 13:48
DOI or Identification number: 10.1002/aur.2028
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9623

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item