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The effect of malondialdehyde is modified by simian virus 40 transformation in human lung fibroblast cells

Yates, SA, Murphy, MF and Moore, SA (2019) The effect of malondialdehyde is modified by simian virus 40 transformation in human lung fibroblast cells. Toxicology. ISSN 0300-483X

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Abstract

The effects of malondialdehyde (MDA), a product of oxidative stress, on normal lung fibroblast cells (MRC5) and transformed c ells (MRC5 SV2) showed differing responses between the two cell lines. MRC5 cells showed lower viability at low MDA concentrations (<250 µM) but had better viability at higher concentrations than the transformed cells. Both cell lines showed an increase in the number of micronuclei, nuclear size and a relocation of p53 to the nucleus with increasing MDA. The expression of p53 was higher in the MRC5 cells at 24 h; 2-8 fold induction vs 1-2.5 fold in the MRC5 SV2 cells, but reduced to almost zero at 48 h in the MRC5 cells. Mutation sequencing of the PCR products of a 689 bp region (residues 4640-5328) of the TP53 gene revealed MRC5 had more mutations than MRC5 SV2 cells (n = 21 and 11 respectively) and that they were predominantly insertions (MRC5 81%, MRC5 SV2 100%). A common mutation was observed in both cell lines; a G insertion at residue 4724 (n = 7) which could prove to be a mutational hotspot. These results indicate that the transformed cells are slower to respond to oxidative stress and/or mutagenic compounds. The mutation spectrum of predominantly frameshift mutations (insertions) suggests that oxidative stress plays a minimal role in smoking related lung cancer, but could be of greater importance to other lung diseases and cancer caused by exposures such as passive smokers, passive vapers and atmospheric pollutants.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Divisions: Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2019 09:19
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2019 09:24
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.tox.2019.01.009
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9968

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