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Mate-guarding constrains feeding activity but not energetic status of wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

Girard-Buttoz, C and Heistermann, M and Rahmi, E and Marzec, A and Agil, M and Fauzan, PA and Engelhardt, A (2014) Mate-guarding constrains feeding activity but not energetic status of wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 68 (4). pp. 583-595. ISSN 0340-5443

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Abstract

Mate-guarding is an important determinant of male reproductive success in a number of species. Little is known however about the constraints of this behaviour, e.g. the associated energetic costs. We investigated these costs in long-tailed macaques where alpha males mate guard females to a lesser extent than predicted by the priority of access model. The study was carried out during two mating periods on three wild groups living in the Gunung Leuser National Park, Indonesia. We combined behavioural observations on males' locomotion and feeding activity, GPS records of distance travelled and non-invasive measurements of urinary C-peptide (UCP), a physiological indicator of male energetic status. Mate-guarding led to a decrease in feeding time and fruit consumption suggesting a reduced intake of energy. At the same time, vertical locomotion was reduced, which potentially saved energy. These findings, together with the fact that we did not find an effect of mate-guarding on UCP levels, suggest that energy intake and expenditure was balanced during mate-guarding in our study males. Mate-guarding thus seems to not be energetically costly under all circumstances. Given that in strictly seasonal rhesus macaques, high-ranking males lose physical condition over the mating period, we hypothesise that the energetic costs of mate-guarding vary inter-specifically depending on the degree of seasonality and that males of non-strictly seasonal species might be better adapted to maintain balanced energetic condition year-round. Finally, our results illustrate the importance of combining behavioural assessments of both energy intake and expenditure with physiological measures when investigating energetic costs of behavioural strategies.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-013-1673-8
Uncontrolled Keywords: 06 Biological Sciences, 05 Environmental Sciences, 07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QL Zoology
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Springer
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2016 13:48
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2016 13:48
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s00265-013-1673-8
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2534

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