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Who were they really? model-free and model-bound dental nonmetric analyses to affirm documented population affiliations of seven South African "Bantu" samples.

Irish, JD (2015) Who were they really? model-free and model-bound dental nonmetric analyses to affirm documented population affiliations of seven South African "Bantu" samples. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. ISSN 1096-8644

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: For bioarchaeological biodistance analyses it is common to "assume" that skeletal samples are representative of the populations to which they are attributed. Here, alternatively, samples with "known" attribution in the Raymond A. Dart Collection are assessed regarding their suitability for use in such analyses. Prior curation issues may call their ascribed identities into question. MATERIALS AND METHODS: These 20th century samples ostensibly derive from South African Ndebele, Sotho, Swazi, Tswana, Venda, Xosa, and Zulu populations. First, the mean measure of divergence (MMD) is used to obtain among-sample dental phenetic distances for comparison with documented population relationships. Second, the Mantel test evaluates fit of the isolation-by-distance model between MMD and geographic distances, i.e., among the historic homelands. Third, R-matrices and minimum and estimated Fst from MMD distances give an indication of genetic micro-differentiation. RESULTS: Output from these model-free and model-bound analyses suggest that five and perhaps six samples are representative of their attributed populations-presenting differences along population lines and evidence of more ancient ancestry. DISCUSSION: Other than the Swazi and perhaps Nedebele, the among-sample variation: 1) mirrors documented population history, 2) reveals a moderately positive correlation between phenetic and geographic distances, and 3) although evidencing much homogeneity, provides measures of genetic distance in support of the phenetic distances. Therefore, with the two noted exceptions-perhaps from collection issues, swamping of past genetic structure, or both, most samples appear suitable for bioarchaeological analyses. On this basis, results are offered to supplement published findings concerning the biological relationships of these peoples. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Irish, J. D. (2015), Who were they really? model-free and model-bound dental nonmetric analyses to affirm documented population affiliations of seven South African “Bantu” samples. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.22928. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0603 Evolutionary Biology, 1601 Anthropology, 2101 Archaeology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2016 11:56
Last Modified: 30 Dec 2016 00:50
DOI or Identification number: 10.1002/ajpa.22928
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2568

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