Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

The role of sucrose and sensory systems in fruit selection and consumption of Ateles geoffroyi in Yucatan, Mexico

Pablo-Rodriguez, M and Teresa Hernandez-Salazar, L and Aureli, F and Schaffner, CM (2015) The role of sucrose and sensory systems in fruit selection and consumption of Ateles geoffroyi in Yucatan, Mexico. JOURNAL OF TROPICAL ECOLOGY, 31 (3). pp. 213-219. ISSN 0266-4674

[img] Text
Sugar paper JTE.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (84kB)

Abstract

Our aim was to evaluate the role of sucrose and the role of smell, taste and touch in the selection and consumption of fruit in wild spider monkeys. We recorded the feeding bouts of 14 adults for 9 mo in the Otoch Ma’ax Yetel Kooh Reserve, Punta Laguna, Yucatan, Mexico. For each of 2346 inspections on fruits of six species the consumption or rejection and the use of touch, smell and taste was recorded. Ten fruit samples (five ripe and five unripe) from each species were collected and the sucrose concentration was determined with a refractometer. As expected, sucrose concentrations were higher in ripe than unripe fruits. The difference in sucrose concentration between ripe and unripe fruits was positively associated with the proportion of inspections on ripe fruits and the proportion of consumed ripe fruits. Furthermore, the senses of touch and taste were used more often when fruits were ripe, whereas the sense of smell was used more often when fruits were unripe. The results suggest that sensory cues and sucrose concentration play important roles in fruit selection in spider monkeys.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0602 Ecology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2016 09:32
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2017 07:04
DOI or Identification number: 10.1017/S0266467415000085
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3109

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item