Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

REPEATED WARM WATER IMMERSION INDUCES SIMILAR CEREBROVASCULAR ADAPTATIONS TO 8-WEEKS OF MODERATE-INTENSITY EXERCISE TRAINING IN FEMALES

Jones, H and Bailey, TG and Cable, NT and Sprung, VS and Low, DA and Miller, GD (2016) REPEATED WARM WATER IMMERSION INDUCES SIMILAR CEREBROVASCULAR ADAPTATIONS TO 8-WEEKS OF MODERATE-INTENSITY EXERCISE TRAINING IN FEMALES. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 37 (6). ISSN 0172-4622

[img] Text
Exercise_WarmWater_Females_2016 IJSM for deposit.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 June 2017.

Download (668kB)

Abstract

Exercise training has potential to positively impact cerebrovascular function in healthy and diseased individuals. Passive heat training using warm water immersion has recently been shown to enhance systemic vascular function including the cerebrovascular response to heating. We suggest that a passive heating intervention can be a useful adjunct or alternative to exercise training. Our aim was to directly compare the effects of exercise with warm water immersion training on cerebrovascular and thermoregulatory function. 18 females (25±5y) performed 8-weeks of moderate-intensity cycling (70% HRmax) or warm-water immersion (42°C) for 30 min three times per week. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiorespiratory fitness were measured prior to and following both interventions. A passive heat stress was employed to obtain temperature thresholds (Tb) and sensitivities for chest and forearm sweat rate (SR) and cutaneous vasodilation (CVC). Middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) was measured at rest and throughout heat stress. FMD (P=0.003) and VO2peak (P<0.001) improved following both interventions. MCAv and cerebrovascular conductance were higher at rest (P<0.001 and 0.05, respectively) and during passive heating (P<0.001 and <0.001, respectively) following both interventions. Chest and forearm SR occurred at a lower Tb post-intervention with no difference between interventions. Chest and forearm SR sensitivity were increased after both interventions with no differences between interventions at the forearm but a larger increase at the chest (P<0.001) following water immersion compared to exercise training. Chest and forearm CVC occurred at a lower Tb (P<0.001) following both interventions with no differences between interventions or over time. Warm water immersion training elicits favourable and similar cerebrovascular, conduit- and thermoregulatory adaptations compared to a period of moderate-intensity exercise training over 8-weeks.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science, 0913 Mechanical Engineering
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2016 11:20
Last Modified: 08 Jul 2016 10:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1055/s-0042-106899
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3701

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item