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THE “ATHLETIC HEART”: INSIGHTS FROM MODERN IMAGING TOOLS IN CAUCASIAN AND WEST AFRICAN ATHLETES.

Utomi, VS (2015) THE “ATHLETIC HEART”: INSIGHTS FROM MODERN IMAGING TOOLS IN CAUCASIAN AND WEST AFRICAN ATHLETES. Doctoral thesis, Liverpool John Moores University.

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Abstract

A seminal study by Morganroth et al (1975) demonstrated a differential pattern of cardiac adaptation with prolonged exercise training; of eccentric pattern of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in endurance trained athletes (ET) and concentric LVH in resistance trained athletes (RT). Specific inconsistencies related to the nature of any adaptation to RT; the value of new imaging technologies; the relative importance of scaling of cardiac data for differences in body size; the impact of training on the right ventricle (RV) and the fit of differential pattern of adaptation in athletes with Black ethnicity have driven the rationale for the studies included in this thesis.Study one employed meta-analysis techniques to critically evaluate the evidence base supporting or refuting that MH exists in elite male Caucasian ET & RT. Modern echocardiographic techniques were used to test whether a dichotomous LV and RV structural as well as global and regional functional adaptation was apparent in elite Caucasian ET & RT in studies 2 & 3. The final study (exploratory) was to characterize the athletic heart phenotype in a homogenous population of elite RT of West African origin (WRT) to provide new insight in relation to cardiac adaptation and ECG characteristics in non-Caucasian athlete groups. Allometric scaling approach was deployed to index LV and RV data for individual body variance in body size.The novel findings of this thesis; larger LV data in ET (LVMg: ET 232 (200 to 260), RT 220 (205 to 234), CT 166 (145 to 186) but no concentric hypertrophy in RT within the meta-analysis, predominance of normal geometry in male athletes (65% of ET and 95% of RT) and the lack of concentric pattern of hypertrophy in RT in a cross-sectional study; no RV adaptation in RT athletes (RVD1mm: ET 45 ± 5 (39 to 57), RT 40 ± 5 (32 to 51) CT 39 ± 4 (31 to 45); no LV or RV adaptation in WRT athletes; the importance of appropriate scaling of cardiac parameters; provide a useful re-evaluation of concepts and models in the athletic heart literature. The findings have important implications for cardiovascular screening of athletes.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Athlete’s heart, Ventricle, hypertrophy, tissue-Doppler, speckle tracking echocardiography
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2016 15:29
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2017 11:59
Supervisors: George, Keith and Whyte, Greg and Somauroo, John
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4557

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