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An investigation into physical activity and classroom behaviours in children with intellectual disabilities.

Taylor, SL (2015) An investigation into physical activity and classroom behaviours in children with intellectual disabilities. Masters thesis, Liverpool John Moores University.

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Abstract

In typically developing children, research indicates that physical activity has positive influences not only on health but also academic attainment and classroom behaviour. Children with intellectual disabilities appear to exhibit less activity levels than their peers without disability. Coronary diseases are also more frequent within this group, as is challenging behaviour in the classroom environment. This study investigated habitual physical activity in 21 children with intellectual disabilities. Recess physical activity and classroom behaviour pre- and post- lunch recess were assessed in 17 of these participants. Objective methods (accelerometers) were used to measure physical activity whilst classroom behaviour was assessed using teacher ratings. Results showed that a large proportion of children (73% of the cohort) achieved 60 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. Percentage time spent sedentary and in moderate to vigorous physical activity were not significantly different from weekday to weekend. Percentage time spent sedentary was significantly higher before (73.4%) and after (70.5%) school in comparison to during the school day (65.6%). During recess 6.4 minutes (SD = ± 4.4) of moderate to vigorous physical activity was accrued and habitual physical activity levels did not significantly predict recess physical activity. Classroom behaviour differed significantly from pre- to post- recess, with the total amount of physical activity and time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity during recess negatively correlating to behaviour ratings regarding disruptive behaviour post- recess. It appears that the special educational needs classroom setting allowed for reduced sedentary behaviour. However, physical activity during lesson time was not associated with better behaviour. Activity during lessons may not always be deemed appropriate by teachers; children with intellectual disabilities who struggle to stay on task for long periods of time may need regular structured activity breaks in lessons and to accrue more moderate to vigorous physical activity during recess.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV561 Sports
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 27 Oct 2016 09:39
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2016 10:05
Supervisors: Boddy, LM
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4597

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