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The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-induced Core Body Temperature Elevations.

Veltmeijer, MT, Veeneman, D, Bongers, CC, Netea, MG, van der Meer, JW, Eijsvogels, TM and Hopman, MT (2016) The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-induced Core Body Temperature Elevations. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. ISSN 1555-0273

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Exercise increases core body temperature (TC) due to metabolic heat production. However, the exercise-induced release of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 may also contribute to the rise in TC by increasing the hypothalamic temperature setpoint. We aimed to investigate whether the exercise-induced increase in TC is partly caused by an altered hypothalamic temperature setpoint. METHODS: 15 healthy, active male subjects aged 36±14 years were recruited. Subjects performed submaximal treadmill exercise in 3 randomized test conditions: (1) ibuprofen 400mg and acetaminophen 1000mg (IBU/APAP), (2) acetaminophen 1000mg (APAP) and (3) a control condition (CTRL). Acetaminophen and ibuprofen were used to block the effect of interleukin-6 at a central and peripheral level, respectively. TC, skin temperature and heart rate were measured continuously during the submaximal exercise tests. RESULTS: Baseline values of TC, skin temperature and heart rate did not differ across conditions. Serum interleukin-6 concentrations increased in all three conditions. A significantly lower peak TC was observed in IBU/APAP (38.8±0.4°C) versus CTRL (39.2±0.5°C, p=0.02), but not in APAP (38.9±0.4°C) versus CTRL. Similarly, a lower ΔTC was observed in IBU/APAP (1.7±0.3°C) versus CTRL (2.0±0.5°C, p<0.02), but not in APAP (1.7±0.5°C) versus CTRL. No differences were observed in skin temperature and heart rate responses across conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The combined administration of acetaminophen and ibuprofen resulted in an attenuated increase in TC during exercise when compared to a control condition. This observation suggests that a prostaglandin E2 induced elevated hypothalamic temperature setpoint may contribute to the exercise-induced rise in TC.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: As accepted for publication, item can be found at:http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0382
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2016 12:08
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2016 12:08
DOI or Identification number: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0382
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4715

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