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The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-induced Core Body Temperature Elevations.

Veltmeijer, MT and Veeneman, D and Bongers, CC and Netea, MG and van der Meer, JW and Eijsvogels, TM and Hopman, MT (2016) The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-induced Core Body Temperature Elevations. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. ISSN 1555-0273

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Exercise increases core body temperature (TC) due to metabolic heat production. However, the exercise-induced release of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 may also contribute to the rise in TC by increasing the hypothalamic temperature setpoint. We aimed to investigate whether the exercise-induced increase in TC is partly caused by an altered hypothalamic temperature setpoint. METHODS: 15 healthy, active male subjects aged 36±14 years were recruited. Subjects performed submaximal treadmill exercise in 3 randomized test conditions: (1) ibuprofen 400mg and acetaminophen 1000mg (IBU/APAP), (2) acetaminophen 1000mg (APAP) and (3) a control condition (CTRL). Acetaminophen and ibuprofen were used to block the effect of interleukin-6 at a central and peripheral level, respectively. TC, skin temperature and heart rate were measured continuously during the submaximal exercise tests. RESULTS: Baseline values of TC, skin temperature and heart rate did not differ across conditions. Serum interleukin-6 concentrations increased in all three conditions. A significantly lower peak TC was observed in IBU/APAP (38.8±0.4°C) versus CTRL (39.2±0.5°C, p=0.02), but not in APAP (38.9±0.4°C) versus CTRL. Similarly, a lower ΔTC was observed in IBU/APAP (1.7±0.3°C) versus CTRL (2.0±0.5°C, p<0.02), but not in APAP (1.7±0.5°C) versus CTRL. No differences were observed in skin temperature and heart rate responses across conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The combined administration of acetaminophen and ibuprofen resulted in an attenuated increase in TC during exercise when compared to a control condition. This observation suggests that a prostaglandin E2 induced elevated hypothalamic temperature setpoint may contribute to the exercise-induced rise in TC.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: As accepted for publication, item can be found at:http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2016-0382
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2016 12:08
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2016 12:08
DOI or Identification number: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0382
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/4715

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