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Fasted High-Intensity Interval and Moderate-Intensity Exercise do not Lead to Detrimental 24-Hour Blood Glucose Profiles.

Scott, SN, Cocks, MS, Andrews, RC, Narendran, P, Purewal, TS, Cuthbertson, DJ, Wagenmakers, AJM and Shepherd, SO (2018) Fasted High-Intensity Interval and Moderate-Intensity Exercise do not Lead to Detrimental 24-Hour Blood Glucose Profiles. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. ISSN 0021-972X

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Abstract

Aims: To compare the effect of a bout of high-intensity interval training (HIT) with a bout of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on glucose concentrations over the subsequent 24h period. METHODS: Fourteen people with type 1 diabetes (duration of type 1 diabetes 8.2±1.4 years), all on basal-bolus regimen, completed a randomised, counterbalanced, crossover study. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess glycaemic control following a single bout of HIT (6 x 1min intervals) and 30 mins of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on separate days, compared to a non-exercise control day (CON). Exercise was undertaken following an overnight fast with omission of short-acting insulin. Capillary blood glucose samples were recorded pre and post-exercise to assess the acute changes in glycaemia during HIT and MICT. RESULTS: There was no difference in the incidence of or percentage time spent in hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia or target glucose range over the 24h and nocturnal period (24:00-06:00h) between CON, HIT and MICT (P>0.05). Blood glucose concentrations were not significantly (P=0.49) different from pre to post-exercise with HIT (+0.39±0.42 mmol/L) or MICT (-0.39±0.66 mmol/L), with no difference between exercise modes (P=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: HIT or 30 mins of MICT can be carried out after an overnight fast with no increased risk of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia, and provided the pre-exercise glucose concentration is 7-14 mmol/L, no additional carbohydrate ingestion is necessary to undertake these exercises. As HIT is a time-efficient form of exercise, the efficacy and safety of long-term HIT should now be explored.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism following peer review. The version of record Sam N Scott, Matt Cocks, Rob C Andrews, Parth Narendran, Tejpal S Purewal, Daniel J Cuthbertson, Anton J M Wagenmakers, Sam O Shepherd; FASTED HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL AND MODERATE-INTENSITY EXERCISE DO NOT LEAD TO DETRIMENTAL 24-HOUR BLOOD GLUCOSE PROFILES, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2018-01308
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2018 10:05
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2018 10:20
DOI or Identification number: 10.1210/jc.2018-01308
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9401

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