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Aging, effort, and stereotyping: The evidence for the moderating role of self-involvement

Czarnek, G, Kossowska, M and Richter, M (2019) Aging, effort, and stereotyping: The evidence for the moderating role of self-involvement. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 138. pp. 1-10. ISSN 0167-8760

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Abstract

A study with young and older adults (N=91) investigated the effect of self-involvement on stereotyping tendency and effort mobilization. We hypothesized that the impact of self-involvement varies as a function of age: increased self-involvement should lead older adults to engage in more effortful information processing and decreased stereotyping, whereas increased self-involvement should have no impact on effort mobilization and stereotyping tendency in young adults. Young and older adults read narratives under low and high-self-involvement conditions before performing a recognition test that measured their stereotyping tendency. Effort was assessed as cardiovascular responses. We found that older adults in the high-self-involvement condition presented low stereotyping tendency (similar to that of young people) in comparison to older adults in the low-self-involvement condition. Furthermore, older adults in the high-self-involvement condition had decreased high-frequency heart rate variability in comparison to the other conditions, but only during the recognition test; this suggests increased effort mobilization. These findings suggest that self-involvement decreases older adults’ stereotyping tendency, possibly through effort mobilization.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 11 Medical and Health Sciences, 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2019 09:57
Last Modified: 05 Apr 2019 16:54
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10051

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