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Internationalising the Curriculum: A Review of the Main Teaching and Learning Approaches and Activities undertaken by Leading Business Management Programs in the UK and US

Papagiannis, F and Gallagher, EM Internationalising the Curriculum: A Review of the Main Teaching and Learning Approaches and Activities undertaken by Leading Business Management Programs in the UK and US. In: Learning , Teaching and Student Experiece -LTSE 2019, 14 May 2019 - 15 May 2019, Manchester. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The aim of this study is to identify the main approaches and activities undertaken by leading business schools across the UK and US in support of internationalisation. It synthesises how curriculum internationalisation is operationalised in the business management context and identifies examples of international best practices utilised to engage international students. Then, it demonstrates the empirical and epistemological value of these findings to LJMU’s BA (Hons) Business Management programmmes. Thus, it contributes to practical recommendations regarding to curriculum internationalisation. To achieve the study’s aim, a systematic literature review following Tranfield et al.’s (2003) approach is undertaken. The Higher Education literature relevant to internationalisation and in particular, the pedagogic approaches that influence business schools and business management programmes’ curriculum design are examined. The findings indicate that business management programmes employ polymorphous teaching and learning approaches and activities in their efforts to holistically embed curriculum internationalisation. However, when considered in light of Edwards et al.’s typology (2003) of curriculum internationalisation, the plethora of the activities currently undertaken are focusing on “international awareness” and “international expertise”. This demonstrates that many programs overlook “international competence”. As a result, students may not be adequately prepared for “international expertise” which leads to shortage of global leaders and professionals. Finally, this research demonstrates the need for a further strategic analysis to fully embrace curriculum internationalisation across the discipline of business management. It catalytically reveals internationalisation parameters ensuring that students are properly skilled to address the seismic changes of managing business in a dynamic global environment.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > HF5001 Business
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Liverpool Business School
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2019 07:35
Last Modified: 20 Jun 2019 07:35
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10673

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