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Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantitative analysis of 1P-LSD and its tentative metabolite LSD in fortified urine and serum samples including stability tests for 1P-LSD under different storage conditions

Grumann, C, Henkel, K, Stratford, A, Hermanns-Clausen, M, Passie, T, Brandt, SD and Auwärter, V (2019) Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantitative analysis of 1P-LSD and its tentative metabolite LSD in fortified urine and serum samples including stability tests for 1P-LSD under different storage conditions. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. ISSN 0731-7085

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Abstract

A variety of hallucinogens of the lysergamide type has emerged on the drug market in recent years and one such uncontrolled derivative of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is 1 propionyl LSD (1P LSD). Due to the high potency of LSD and some of its derivatives (common doses: 50-200 µg), sensitive methods are required for the analysis of biological samples such as serum and urine. The occurrence of an intoxication case required the development of a fully validated, highly sensitive method for the quantification of 1P LSD and LSD in urine and serum using LC-MS/MS. Given that LSD is unstable in biological samples when exposed to light or elevated temperatures, we also conducted stability tests for 1P LSD in urine and serum under different storage conditions. The validation results revealed that the analysis method was accurate and precise with good linearity over a wide calibration range (0.015-0.4 ng mL-1). The limit of detection (LOD) and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 1P-LSD and LSD in serum and urine were 0.005 ng mL-1 and 0.015 ng mL-1, respectively. The stability tests showed no major degradation of 1P LSD in urine and serum stored at -20 °C, 5 °C or at room temperature for up to five days, regardless of protection from light. However, LSD was detected in all samples stored at room temperature showing a temperature-dependent hydrolysis of 1P LSD to LSD to some extent (up to 21% in serum). Serum samples were particularly prone to hydrolysis possibly due to enzymatically catalyzed reactions. The addition of sodium fluoride prevented the enzymatic formation of LSD. The method was applied to samples obtained from the intoxication case involving 1P LSD. The analysis uncovered 0.51 ng mL-1 LSD in urine and 3.4 ng mL-1 LSD in serum, whereas 1P LSD remained undetected. So far pharmacokinetic data of 1P LSD is missing, but with respect to the results of our stability tests and the investigated case rapid hydrolysis to LSD in vivo seems more likely than instabilities of 1P¬LSD in urine and serum samples.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0301 Analytical Chemistry, 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Divisions: Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2019 08:58
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2019 09:00
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.jpba.2019.05.062
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10767

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