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The effect of sertraline, haloperidol and apomorphine on the behavioural manipulation of slugs (Deroceras invadens) by the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita

Cutler, J, Williamson, SM and Rae, R (2019) The effect of sertraline, haloperidol and apomorphine on the behavioural manipulation of slugs (Deroceras invadens) by the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita. Behavioural Processes. ISSN 0376-6357

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Abstract

The nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita can infect and kill many species of slugs and has been formulated into a biological control agent for farmers and gardeners. P. hermaphrodita can manipulate the behaviour of slugs, making those infected move to areas where the nematode is present. Research suggests P. hermaphrodita uses manipulation of biogenic amines to achieve this, however the exact role of serotonin and dopamine needs further elucidation. Here we fed slugs Deroceras invadens (uninfected and infected with P. hermaphrodita) apomorphine, sertraline and haloperidol and observed their behaviour when given a choice between a P. hermaphrodita infested habitat, or a parasite free area of soil. In contrast to their usual P. hermaphrodita avoidance behaviour, uninfected D. invadens fed sertraline were attracted to the nematodes and conversely those fed haloperidol avoided the nematodes. D. invadens fed apomorphine were recorded equally on the control and nematode side. D. invadens pre-infected with P. hermaphrodita fed sertraline and apomorphine were found significantly more on the side with the nematodes. However, suppressing dopaminergic signalling through feeding with haloperidol abrogated this attraction and slugs were found on both sides. These results demonstrate that serotonin and dopamine are important potential regulators of behavioural manipulation by P. hermaphrodita.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0801 Artificial Intelligence and Image Processing, 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Sciences, 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QL Zoology
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2019 09:56
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2019 10:15
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.beproc.2019.06.009
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10862

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