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A cross-sectional study of child injury ambulance call-out characteristics and their utility in surveillance

Critchley, KA and Quigg, Z A cross-sectional study of child injury ambulance call-out characteristics and their utility in surveillance. Journal of Paramedic Practice, 11 (7). ISSN 1759-1376 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Background: Injuries are a leading cause of death and ill-health in children. Aims: To explore the potential utility of ambulance call-out data in understanding the burden and characteristics of child injury. Methods: A cross-sectional examination was carried out of injury-related ambulance call-outs to children aged 0–14 years in the north west of England between April 2016 and March 2017. Findings: The majority of the 16 285 call-outs were for unintentional injuries (91.4%), with falls the most prevalent injury type (38.4%). The incidence of child injury ambulance call-outs peaked at age 1 year (233.4 per 10 000 population). Burns in children aged 5–9 years were significantly higher at weekends (P=0.003) and on celebration days (P=0.001); poisoning in 10–14 year-olds were significantly higher at weekends (P=0.001); and traffic injuries were significantly lower at weekends in 0–4 year-olds (P=0.009) and 10–14 year-olds (P=0.003). Conclusion: Ambulance call-out data can provide epidemiological support in examining the characteristics of child injury and identifying at-risk groups.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: Mark Allen Healthcare
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2019 10:51
Last Modified: 05 Jul 2019 11:00
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/10988

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