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“It’s Like Hating Puppies!” Employee Disengagement and Corporate Social Responsibility

Hejjas, K, Miller, G and Scarles, C (2018) “It’s Like Hating Puppies!” Employee Disengagement and Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics, 157 (2). pp. 319-337. ISSN 0167-4544

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Abstract

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been linked with numerous organizational advantages, including recruitment, retention, productivity, and morale, which relate specifically to employees. However, despite specific benefits of CSR relating to employees and their importance as a stakeholder group, it is noteworthy that a lack of attention has been paid to the individual level of analysis with CSR primarily being studied at the organizational level. Both research and practice of CSR have largely treated the individual organization as a “black box,” failing to account for individual differences amongst employees and the resulting variations in antecedents to CSR engagement or disengagement. This is further exacerbated by the tendency in stakeholder theory to homogenize priorities within a single stakeholder group. In response, utilizing case study data drawn from three multinational tourism and hospitality organizations, combined with extensive interview data collected from CSR leaders, industry professionals, engaged, and disengaged employees, this exploratory research produces a finer-grained understanding of employees as a stakeholder group, identifying a number of opportunities and barriers for individual employee engagement in CSR interventions. This research proposes that employees are situated along a spectrum of engagement from actively engaged to actively disengaged. While there are some common drivers of engagement across the entire spectrum of employees, differences also exist depending on the degree to which employees, rather than senior management, support corporate responsibility within their organizations. Key antecedents to CSR engagement that vary depending on employees’ existing level of broader engagement include organizational culture, CSR intervention design, employee CSR perceptions, and the observed benefits of participation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1503 Business and Management, 2201 Applied Ethics, 1505 Marketing
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > HF5001 Business
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
Divisions: Liverpool Business School (closed 31 Aug 19)
Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Date Deposited: 30 Aug 2019 07:41
Last Modified: 30 Aug 2019 10:29
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s10551-018-3791-8
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11237

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