Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

The composition and oxidative stability of vegetarian omega-3 algal oil nanoemulsions suitable for functional food enrichment

Lane, KE, Zhou, Q, Robinson, S and Li, W The composition and oxidative stability of vegetarian omega-3 algal oil nanoemulsions suitable for functional food enrichment. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. ISSN 0022-5142 (Accepted)

[img] Text
JSFA Main Text File amendments for submission.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (834kB)
[img] Text
JSFA Figures 08.08.2019.nv.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (489kB)
[img] Text
JSFA Tables 08.08.2019.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (686kB)

Abstract

Background: Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCn3PUFA) nanoemulsion enriched foods offer potential to address habitually low oily fish intakes. Nanoemulsions increase LCn3PUFA bioavailability, but may cause lipid oxidation. This study examined oxidative stability of LCn3PUFA algal oil-in-water nanoemulsions created by ultrasound using natural and synthetic emulsifiers during 5-weeks of storage at 4, 20 and 40°C. Fatty acid composition, droplet size ranges and volatile compounds were analysed. Results: No significant differences were found for fatty acid composition at various temperatures and storage times. Lecithin nanoemulsions had significantly larger droplet size ranges at baseline and during storage regardless of temperatures. While combined Tween 40 and lecithin nanoemulsions had low initial droplet size ranges, there were significant increases at 40°C after 5-weeks storage. Gas chromatograms identified hexanal and propanal as predominant volatile compounds, along with 2-ethylfuran; propan-3-ol; valeraldehyde. The Tween 40 only nanoemulsion sample showed formation of lower concentrations of volatiles compared to lecithin samples. Formation of hexanal and propanal remained stable at lower temperatures although higher concentrations were found in nanoemulsions than bulk oil. The lecithin only sample had formation of higher concentrations of volatiles at increased temperatures despite having significantly larger droplet size ranges than the other samples. Conclusions: Propanal and hexanal were the most prevalent of five volatile compounds detected in bulk oil and lecithin and/or Tween 40 nanoemulsions. Oxidation compounds remained more stable at lower temperatures indicating suitability for enrichment of refrigerated foods. Further research to evaluate the oxidation stability of these systems within food matrices is warranted.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences, 09 Engineering
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
Divisions: Sports & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Wiley
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2019 08:43
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2019 08:43
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11431

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item