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The double negative: Personality differentially predicts sensitivity to need support and thwarting, and subsequent behavioural response planning

Thomas, LB, Fadeeva, A and Oliver, E The double negative: Personality differentially predicts sensitivity to need support and thwarting, and subsequent behavioural response planning. Personality and Individual Differences, 156 (1). ISSN 0191-8869 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Research extending self-determination theory (SDT) recognises that individual differences alter responses to basic psychological need thwarting or supportive environments. Here, two underlying pathways were proposed and tested, namely whether personality alters: i) sensitivity to support or thwarting, and/or ii) more or less adaptive responses to experienced satisfaction or frustration. We also examined whether the influence of personality was stronger as conditions became more unfavourable. The model was tested then replicated, in two different populations. Undergraduate students (N = 177; Mage = 19.63) and retired older adults (N = 117; Mage = 66.28) completed self-report personality questionnaires and responded to a series of SDT-informed vignettes tailored to, and standardised within, each sample context. In both samples hypothesised associations supported both a sensitivity and response pathway. Extraversion and conscientiousness positively predicted adaptive responses, and extraversion and openness (negatively) and neuroticism (positively) maladaptive responses. Moderated regressions provided some evidence that the influence of personality was stronger when more need frustration was experienced (i.e., when conditions were more unfavourable). These findings have important implications for interventions promoting psychological health; targeted rather than universal approaches are required to identify and support those with trait-linked vulnerabilities to perceiving environments as less favourable.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Sports & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2019 10:40
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2019 10:45
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11920

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