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Aquatic Hemiptera in Southwest Cameroon: Biodiversity of Potential Reservoirs of Mycobacterium ulcerans and multiple wolbachia sequence types revealed by metagenomics

Esemu, SN, Dong, X, Kfusi, AJ, Hartley, CS, Ndip, RN, Ndip, LM, Darby, AC, Post, RJ and Makepeace, BL (2019) Aquatic Hemiptera in Southwest Cameroon: Biodiversity of Potential Reservoirs of Mycobacterium ulcerans and multiple wolbachia sequence types revealed by metagenomics. Diversity, 11 (12). ISSN 1424-2818

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Abstract

Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a neglected tropical disease associated with freshwater habitats. A variety of limnic organisms harbor this pathogen, including aquatic bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), which have been hypothesized to be epidemiologically important reservoirs. Aquatic Hemiptera exhibit high levels of diversity in the tropics, but species identification remains challenging. In this study, we collected aquatic bugs from emerging foci of BU in the Southwest Region of Cameroon, which were identified using morphological and molecular methods. The bugs were screened for mycobacterial DNA and a selection of 20 mycobacteria-positive specimens from the families Gerridae and Veliidae were subjected to next-generation sequencing. Only one individual revealed putative M. ulcerans DNA, but all specimens contained sequences from the widespread alphaproteobacterial symbiont, Wolbachia. Phylogenetic analysis placed the Wolbachia sequences into supergroups A, B, and F. Circularized mitogenomes were obtained for seven gerrids and two veliids, the first from these families for the African continent. This study suggests that aquatic Hemiptera may have a minor role (if any) in the spread of BU in Southwest Cameroon. Our metagenomic analysis provides new insights into the incursion of Wolbachia into aquatic environments and generated valuable resources to aid molecular taxonomic studies of aquatic Hemiptera. © 2019 by the authors.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0502 Environmental Science and Management, 0602 Ecology, 0301 Analytical Chemistry, 0906 Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Q Science > QL Zoology
Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions: Biological & Environmental Sciences (new Sep 19)
Publisher: MDPI
Date Deposited: 21 Jan 2020 11:38
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2020 11:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.3390/d11120225
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12066

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