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Sexually transmitted infection diagnoses, sexualised drug use and associations with pre-exposure prophylaxis use among men who have sex with men in the UK

Hibbert, MP, Brett, CE, Porcellato, LA and Hope, V (2020) Sexually transmitted infection diagnoses, sexualised drug use and associations with pre-exposure prophylaxis use among men who have sex with men in the UK. International Journal of STD and AIDS. ISSN 0956-4624

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Abstract

Previous research has focused on acceptability of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use, but few community-based studies have been conducted regarding actual use, and PrEP use in the context of sexualised drug use remains understudied. A national online cross-sectional study recruited men who have sex with men (MSM) via social media (April–June 2018). Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with PrEP use. Bivariate analyses compared engaging in condomless anal intercourse (CAI) under the influence of specific drugs and recent sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses (past 12 months) between MSM taking PrEP and those not. Overall, 6% (99/1581) MSM reported current PrEP use. Factors associated with PrEP use were increasing age, recent genitourinary medicine (GUM) attendance (95% versus 45%, aOR = 6.25, 95%CI 2.05, 19.03), an HIV test in the past three months (89% versus 23%, aOR = 14.22, 95%CI 6.76, 29.90), and recent engagement in chemsex (21% versus 4%, aOR = 3.56, 95%CI 1.78, 7.11). MSM taking PrEP were more likely to have had an STI diagnosis (42% versus 8%), most commonly chlamydia (26% versus 3%) and gonorrhoea (25% versus 4%). Considering the elevated levels of self-reported STI diagnoses among those on PrEP, there was a high level of engagement with sexual health services, which may help reduce onward STI transmission.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1108 Medical Microbiology, 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2020 11:38
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2020 11:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1177/0956462419897222
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12230

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