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Preventive antibiotic treatment of calves: emergence of dysbiosis causing propagation of obese state-associated and mobile multidrug resistance-carrying bacteria

Dobrzanska, DA, Lamaudiere, MTF, Rollason, J, Acton, L, Duncan, M, Compton, S, Simms, J, Weedall, GD and Morozov, IY (2019) Preventive antibiotic treatment of calves: emergence of dysbiosis causing propagation of obese state-associated and mobile multidrug resistance-carrying bacteria. Microbial Biotechnology. ISSN 1751-7915

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Abstract

In agriculture, antibiotics are used for the treatment and prevention of livestock disease. Antibiotics perturb the bacterial gut composition but the extent of these changes and potential consequences for animal and human health is still debated. Six calves were housed in a controlled environment. Three animals received an injection of the antibiotic florfenicol (Nuflor), and three received no treatment. Faecal samples were collected at 0, 3 and 7 days, and bacterial communities were profiled to assess the impact of a therapy on the gut microbiota. Phylogenetic analysis (16S‐rDNA) established that at day 7, antibiotic‐treated microbiota showed a 10‐fold increase in facultative anaerobic Escherichia spp, a signature of imbalanced microbiota, dysbiosis. The antibiotic resistome showed a high background of antibiotic resistance genes, which did not significantly change in response to florfenicol. However, the maintenance of Escherichia coli plasmid‐encoded quinolone, oqxB and propagation of mcr‐2, and colistin resistance genes were observed and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The microbiota of treated animals was enriched with energy harvesting bacteria, common to obese microbial communities. We propose that antibiotic treatment of healthy animals leads to unbalanced, disease‐ and obese‐related microbiota that promotes growth of E. coli carrying resistance genes on mobile elements, potentially increasing the risk of transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria to humans.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 0605 Microbiology
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Divisions: Biological & Environmental Sciences (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2020 13:01
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2020 13:15
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/1751-7915.13496
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12235

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